Seminar on Understanding GBV of Girls of Ethnic Groups in HK by RainLily

Release of Survey on perception, experience and help seeking tendency
towards Gender-based violence (GBV) of girls of ethnic groups in Hong Kong &

Seminar on Understanding GBV of Girls of Ethnic Groups in HK
by RainLily & Department of Applied Social Sciences of City University of HK
 

Evidence shows that teachers and frontline service workers in HK are experiencing difficulties in effectively reaching and working with girls of ethnic groups who are experiencing domestic and sexual violence. Barriers include a lack of cultural and religious sensitivity and insight among teachers, service workers, language difficulties, mistrust of authority. There is a need to build stronger cross-cultural understanding and inter-cultural collaboration. 

To understand the knowledge and perceptions towards GBV of girls of ethnic groups in Hong Kong and to explore and identify barriers in reaching and working with girls of ethnic groups who may be experiencing domestic and sexual violence, RainLily and Department of Applied Social Sciences have co-organized a seminar on understanding GBV of Girls of Ethnic Groups in Hong Kong today (December 2, 2017). Professor Raees Begum Baig from The Chinese University of Hong Kong presented “Knowledge and Perceptions towards Gender-based Violence of Minority Girls in Hong Kong”, while Dr Chan Kam Wah, retired professor from Hong Kong Polytechnic University and Linda Wong, Executive Director of RainLily have presented “Survey on perception, experience and help seeking tendency towards Gender-based violence of girls of ethnic groups in Hong Kong”. Hon. Alice Mak Mei Kuen and Dr. Hon. Fernando Cheung Chiu-hung, LegCo members and Ms Yvonne Lam, Senior Curriculum Development Officer (Moral, Civic and National Education), Education Bureau were invited to participate in the discussion session.

Professor Raees Begum Baig presented “Knowledge and Perceptions towards Gender-based Violence of Minority Girls in Hong Kong” , which was done by qualitative focused interviews on a total of 12 minority girls aged 14 to 18 from Indian, Pakistani and Nepalese ethnic backgrounds. Focused interviews were employed to uncover the tendency of the identified factors in influencing gender and GBV perception constructions, and to gain greater understanding of the cognitions and reasoning on which the perceptions and attitudes are based. The interviews also sought to identify optimum methods and opportunities to educate minorities on gender-related issues, and best forms of interventions for GBV from minority girls’ perspectives. The findings of the study showed that transnational movement has considerable influence on the construction of minority girls’ gender and GBV concepts and perceptions.

Minority girls on one hand are handed down a certain level of traditional cultural practices and ideology, namely patriarchy and authoritarian values, but on the other hand they undergo a constant change process in which such values are held up against more progressive, gender-equitable perspectives. The findings also strongly break the general perception of “ethnic minority” as a confined, homogeneous identity. Minority girls demonstrate the diversity of individuals that exist within minority communities and such individuality cuts across culture, religion, age, education, and migration status. This research project is funded by the Public Policy Research Funding Scheme from the Central Policy Unit of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government.

Dr Chan Kam Wah presented “Understanding Gender-based Violence of Girls of South Asian Ethnic Groups in Hong Kong: Survey Report” and hoped to explore the perception of the girls of the South Asian ethnic groups towards gender equality and GBV; to understand their experiences in GBV and to understand their tendency to seek help if they encountered GBV. 139 valid questionnaires were received from female students aged 14 to 18, belonging to three South Asian ethnic groups: Indian, Pakistani, and Nepalese. The research has found out that majority of girls from ethnic groups have experienced GBV, and they do not have enough knowledge towards GBV. At the same time, the research found out they rarely seek help from professionals, 47% of girls would not seek help from others. Dr Chan pointed out that GBV within families should be given more attention.

Ms Linda Wong concluded the two reports and presented 8 recommendations upon the researches – includes, to provide gender education in schools and communities, to construct a supportive environment to exercise ‘free choice’, to render cultural and gender sensitivity training to police and service providers, to establish specialized teams for handling GBV for ethnic groups, to diversify parental education for minorities, to study the district differences of risks of GBV, to review of ethnic minority service development and funding directives and to reformulate integration and race relations policy.
 
Hon. Alice Mak Mei Kuen and Dr. Hon. Fernando Cheung Chiu-hung, LegCo members and Ms Yvonne Lam, Senior Curriculum Development Officer (Moral, Civic and National Education), Education Bureau were invited to participate in the discussion session. During the seminar, Eva Leung, RainLily project officer has introduced the video “Voices of South Asian girls in Hong Kong”. Three young girls from ethnic groups were interviewed about their views about gender in daily lives.

 

Media Contact
RainLily
Linda Wong Executive Director
Tel:2392 2569 / Email : lindawong@rainlily.org.hk

Vince Chan Communication and Resource Development Assistant
Tel : 6290 9227 (For the event) / Email : vince@rainlily.org.hk

About RainLily 

RainLily is Hong Kong's first one-stop crisis centre for sexual violence victims and has served more than 3000 victims of sexual violence since its establishment in 2000, by providing immediate medical, counselling and legal support.

(RainLily Hotline: 2375 5322)